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Toilet Training at Night

Updated: Jan 8

It’s important to remember that just because your child has mastered using the toilet during the day, doesn’t mean they are ready to keep dry overnight. Children need to be physiologically ready which could be up until they are five, or even older in some cases.


A couple of signs to look out for to see if your little one is ready for night-time toilet training include;


  • They are mostly waking up with a dry nappy or are wetting the nappy shortly after waking (you may notice the nappy is still warm when you get them up).

  • They try to use the toilet in the night or call out for your help.

When you decide to start night-time toilet training make a plan;

  • Will they go to the toilet themselves, wake you to help them, or use a potty in their room?

  • Are they able to get in and out of bed and their room easily?

  • Can they easily remove their own pyjamas and underwear?

  • Is there enough light for them to see what they are doing?

  • Will they wear undies or pull ups?

Once you’ve decided on all the details, talk to your child about the plan and go over it several times throughout the day so they understand what to expect. Every now and then casually remind them that if they need to go to toilet in the night they need to get out of bed.


Include a trip to the toilet as part of their bedtime routine. Don’t limit the amount of fluids they drink before bed if they are thirsty. You can try offering more water throughout the day, so they don’t fill up too much at bedtime.

Remember to put a waterproof matress protector on the bed. When they wake up dry in the morning, praise them. However, if they have wet the bed, don’t make a big deal about it and don’t scald or get angry with them. They haven’t done it on purpose, so don’t punish them, instead, keep calm and reassure them.


If you feel your child is becoming anxious or frustrated with the process. Take the pressure off and try again another time.




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